Whoever harbours enmity for any friend of Mine … I become his hearing by which he hears, his sight by which he sees

Whoever performs salah without sending salutations on me or my Ahlul Bayt, his salah is not accepted
March 11, 2019
Whoever claims that Rasulullah salla Llahu ‘alayhi wa sallam is superior to Yunus ibn Matta has lied
March 11, 2019

BACK⇒ Return to Table of contents

Whoever harbours enmity for any friend of Mine … I become his hearing by which he hears, his sight by which he sees

 

من عادى لي وليا فقد بارزني بالحرب و ما تقرب إلي عبدي بشيء أفضل من أداء ما افترضت عليه و لا يزال عبدي يتقرب إلي بالنوافل حتى أحبه فإذا أحببته كنت سمعه الذي يسمع به و بصره الذي يبصر به و يده التي يبطش بها و رجله التي يمشي بها ولئن دعاني لأعطينه و لئن دعاني لأجيبنه و لئن استعاذ بي لأعيذنه و ما ترددت في شيء أنا فاعله ترددي في قبض نفس عبدي المؤمن يكره الموت و أكره مساءته و لا بد له منه

Whoever harbours enmity for any friend of Mine, has challenged Me in war. My servant does not draw close to Me with anything superior than fulfilling what I have made mandatory upon him. My servant continues gaining proximity to Me by optional acts until I love him. when I love him, I become his hearing by which he hears, his sight by which he sees, his hands with which he holds, and his feet with which he walks. If he asks Me, I most certainly give him. If he implores Me, I most certainly respond to him and if he seeks My protection, I definitely protect him. I do not hesitate in anything I carry out the manner I hesitate in taking the soul of my believing servant who dislikes death and I dislike him feeling bad, yet it is necessary for him.[1]

 

This hadith is explained by another hadith:

فبي يسمع و بي يبصر و بي يبطش و بي يمشي

He hears for My sake, sees for My sake, grabs for My sake and walks for My sake.

 

The wording in the hadith of Sayyidina Anas radiya Llahu ‘anhu is:

 

و من أحببته كنت له سمعا و بصرا و يدا و مؤيدا

Whom I love, I become his hearing, sight, hand, and support.

 

The meaning of the hadith is that when a servant sincerely worships Allah, all his actions becomes solely for Allah. So he only hears for Allah, sees for Allah, i.e. those things permitted by Allah, grabs for Allah, and walks in the obedience of Allah; seeking help from Allah in all of this. That is why some narrations have the wording:

و رجله التي يمشي بها فبي يسمع و بي يبصر

And his leg with which he walks. So he hears for Me and sees for My sake.[2]

 

Allah subhanahu wa ta ‘ala differentiated in the hadith between the implorer and the responder, the seeker of assistance and the one from whom assistance is sought.

Hafiz has listed few meanings of this hadith:

  1. The hadith is metaphorical. The meaning is that I become his hearing and sight in that he prefers obeying My command. So he loves My obedience and favours service to Me just as he loves these organs.
  2. His entire body is absorbed in worshipping Me. Hence, he only listens to that which pleases Me, and only sees that which I have permitted him to.
  3. The mudaf (possessed is a possessive case) is deleted. The meaning is I become the protector of his hearing by which he hears, so he does not listen to anything except what is permissible and the protector of his sight…
  4. He quotes from al Khattabi that the purport is Allah grants ability to a servant to perform actions with these limbs and makes His love easy for him. He protects his limbs and safeguards him from perpetrating things displeasing to Allah, viz. listening to lahw (nonsense), looking at the forbidden, holding what is not permissible, and walking towards evil.
  5. He reports from others that Allah protects him. So he only does that which is pleasing to Allah. When Allah loves him, he dislikes him perpetrating those things displeasing to Him. Hence, his organs only move in the obedience of Allah and for the sake of Allah; so all of the limbs act in truth for The Truth.[3]

 

Next⇒ Whoever claims that Rasulullah salla Llahu ‘alayhi wa sallam is superior to Yunus ibn Matta has lied


[1] Sahih al Bukhari.

[2] Tafsir Ibn Kathir vol. 2 pg. 580.

[3] Fath al Bari vol. 11 pg. 344.

Back to top