Hadith 42: Indeed, from the things that I was promised by Nabi salla Llahu ‘alayhi wa sallam was that the Ummah will act perfidiously with me after his death salla Llahu ‘alayhi wa sallam.

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Hadith 42

 

إن مما عهد إلي النبي صلى الله عليه وسلم أن الأمة ستغدر بي بعده.

Indeed, from the things that I was promised by Nabi salla Llahu ‘alayhi wa sallam was that the Ummah will act perfidiously with me after his death salla Llahu ‘alayhi wa sallam.

 

This hadith is narrated by ‘Ali. It has the following four chains of transmission:

  1. Al Hakim and others narrate — from Hushaym — from Ismail ibn Salim — from Abu Idris al Awdi — from ‘Ali radiya Llahu ‘anhu.[1]

Al Hakim authenticated the hadith and al Dhahabi concurred.

There are two ‘illahs[2] (hidden impairing defect):

  • Abu Idris al Awdi is Ibrahim ibn Haydarah. It has also been said that he is Ibn Abi Hadid. He is majhul (unknown), as mentioned by Abu Hatim. Ibn Hibban regarded him as a thiqah (reliable). On many occasions, it has already been mentioned that Ibn Hibban is a mutasahil (lenient) in regarding majhul (unknown) narrators as thiqat (reliable).
  • Hushaym is ibn Bashir. He is a mudallis[3] (obfuscates when he narrates) of taswiyah[4]. However, he enjoys a tabi’[5] (parallel) narration. Al Dulabi narrates. “Yahya ibn Ghaylan narrated to us — from Abu ‘Awanah — from Ismail ibn Salim; (al Dulabi says again) Fahd ibn ‘Awf narrated to us — Abu ‘Awanah narrated to us — from Ismail ibn Salim — from Abu Idris Ibrahim ibn Abi Hadid al Awdi that ‘Ali ibn Abi Talib said, “Nabi salla Llahu ‘alayhi wa sallam promised me that the Ummah will act perfidiously with me after his death salla Llahu ‘alayhi wa sallam.”[6]

Yahya ibn Ghaylan and Abu ‘Awanah are both thiqah (reliable).

Fahd ibn ‘Awf[7]. He is suspected of lying.

 
  1. Al Hakim narrates — from Hayyan al Asadi who said that he heard ‘Ali saying, “The Messenger of Allah salla Llahu ‘alayhi wa sallam said to me, ‘Indeed, the Ummah will act perfidiously with you after me. And you will live on my millah (tradition). And you will be killed on my Sunnah. Whoever loves you, loves me. And whoever hates you, hates me. And indeed this (i.e. his beard) will soon be stained from this (i.e. from his head).’”[8]

Al Hakim authenticated the hadith and al Dhahabi concurred. However, he did not cite a chain of transmission.

Subsequently, I came across its chain of transmission: al Hakim says —Abu ‘Ali al Hafiz narrated to us — al Haytham ibn Khalaf narrated to us — Muhammad ibn ‘Umar ibn Hiyaj narrated to us — Yahya ibn ‘Abdul Rahman narrated to us— Yunus ibn Abi Ya’fur narrated to us — from his father — from him.[9]

This chain of transmission contains the narrator Yunus ibn Abi Ya’fur. Yahya ibn Ma’in, al Saji, Ahmed ibn Hanbal, al Nasa’i, al ‘Uqayli and Ibn ‘Adi all say he is da’if (weak). Abu Hatim says he is a saduq (sincere). Al ‘Ijli says there is no problem with him. Al Daraqutni says he is a thiqah (reliable).

Ibn Hibban is inconsistent regarding him; in one instance, he regards him as a thiqah (reliable), and in another instance, he regards his as a munkar al hadith (narrates unacceptable reports). He narrates from his father and thiqat (reliable narrators) that which does not resemble the hadith of reliable transmitters. According to me, it is not permissible to consider him as a valid form of proof when he narrates isolated reports.

Most hadith critics regard this hadith as da’if (weak). The statement of Abu Hatim that regards him as a saduq (sincere) does not contradict this view because he (still) has a weak memory. Regarding al Daraqutni’s statement about him that he is a thiqah (reliable), others more senior and knowledgeable than him have come before him and stated that he is da’if (weak). And Allah knows best.

 
  1. Al Bazzar narrates — from Sharik — from Ajlah — from Habib ibn Abi Thabit — from Tha’labah ibn Yazid — from his father. This is what he said. I think he made a mistake; he is transmitting this hadith from ‘Ali, “I heard ‘Ali saying on the pulpit, ‘By Allah, the Unlettered Nabi salla Llahu ‘alayhi wa sallam promised me that the Ummah will act perfidiously with me.’” [10]

Sharik is da’if (weak).

There is a difference of opinion regarding the status of Ajlah.

Habib ibn Abi Thabit is a mudallis (obfuscates when he narrates).

Imam al Bukhari writes in the biography of Tha’labah ibn Yazid after mentioning this hadith: “This hadith is la utaba’ ‘alayh (unacceptable).”[11]

Ibn ‘Adi narrates – ‘Ali ibn al ‘Abbas narrated to me — ‘Abbad ibn Ya’qub narrated to me — ‘Ali ibn Hashim narrated to me — from Muhammad ibn Salamah ibn Kuhayl[12] from his father — from Tha’labah al Himmani that he heard ‘Ali saying…[13]

The chain of transmission contains the narrator Muhammad ibn Salamah ibn Kuhayl. He is da’if (weak).[14]

Al ‘Uqayli and others narrate from — Habib ibn Abi Thabit — from Tha’labah ibn Yazid al Himmani — from ‘Ali.[15]

This chain of transmission is da’if (weak). It contains the narrator Tha’labah ibn Yazid al Himmani. Imam al Bukhari says that his hadith require investigation and that it does not enjoy tawabi’ (parallel narrations), hence it is unacceptable. Imam al Nasa’i says he is a thiqah (reliable). Al ‘Uqayli, Ibn ‘Adi and Ibn Hibban all mention him in their respective works on weak transmitters.

Habib ibn Abi Thabit is a mudallis (obfuscates when he narrates).

Ibn ‘Asakir narrates from Hussain ibn Mukhariq ibn Warqa Abu Junadah.[16]

Al Daraqutni says he fabricates hadith. Ibn al Jawzi reported from Ibn Hibban that he said it is not permissible to consider him as a valid form of proof. Al Tabarani says that he is a thiqah (reliable).[17]

 
  1. Ibn al Jawzi and others narrate from ‘Ali ibn Yazid[18] al Suda’i — from Fitr — Hakim ibn Jubayr — from Ibrahim — from ‘Alqamah who said, “‘Ali said…”[19]

Hakim ibn Jubayr from al Nakha’i is da’if (weak) in hadith.

‘Ali ibn Yazid al Suda’i is da’if (weak).

Al Albani says this hadith is da’if (weak).[20]

 

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[1] Al Hakim: Mustadrak al Hakim, hadith no. 4676.

[2] For an explanation of this term. please see p. [translator’s note]

[3] For an explanation of this term. please see p. [translator’s note]

[4] The term taswiyah refers to a form of tadlis (obfuscation in narrating) whereby a weak narrator who comes somewhere in the chain between two reliable narrators is omitted. It is necessary that the two reliable narrators whom the omission falls in between have met each other. [translator’s note]

[5] For an explanation of this term. please see p. [translator’s note]

[6] Al Dulabi: al Kuna wa al Asma’, 1/563.

[7] In the edition of al Kuna, his name appears as Fahr. However, the correct name is as I have mentioned.

[8] Al Hakim: Mustadrak al Hakim, hadith no. 4686.

[9] Ibn Hajar: Ithaf al Maharah, 11/296.

[10] Al Bazzar: Musnad al Bazzar, hadith no. 869.

[11] Imam al Bukhari: al Tarikh al Kabir, 2/174.

[12] In the copy of al Kamil, the name appears as Jahl. However, the correct name is as I have mentioned.

[13] Ibn ‘Adi: al Kamil, 6/216.

[14] Ibn Hajar: Lisan al Mizan, 5/183.

[15] Al ‘Uqayli: al Du’afa’ al Kabir, 1/178.

[16] Ibn ‘Asakir: Tarikh Dimashq, 42/447.

[17] Ibn Hajar: Lisan al Mizan, 2/319.

[18] In the copy of al ‘Ilal, the name appears as Zaid. However, the correct name is as I have mentioned.

[19] Ibn al Jawzi: al ‘Ilal al Mutanahiyah, 1/390.

[20] Al Albani: Silsilat Ahadith al Da’ifah, hadith no. 4905.