Hadith 16: Once, I was ill and so the Prophet salla Llahu ‘alayhi wa sallam visited me. He entered my presence while I was reclining…

BACK Return to Table of contents

 

Hadith 16

 

مرضت فعادني رسول الله صلى الله عليه وسلم، فدخل علي وأنا مضطجع، فاتكأ إلى جنبي، ثم سجاني بثوبه، فلما رآني قد هديت، قام إلى المسجد يصلي، فلما قضى صلاته، جاء فرفع الثوب عني، وقال: قم يا علي فقد برئت. فقمت كأنما لم أشتك شيئا قبل ذلك. فقال: ما سألت ربي شيئا في صلاتي إلا أعطاني، وما سألت لنفسي شيئا إلا وقد سألت لك.

Once, I was ill and so the Prophet salla Llahu ‘alayhi wa sallam visited me. He entered my presence while I was reclining. He leaned to my side and covered me with his thawb (garment). When he saw that I had gained my composure, he went to the masjid to read salah. After completing his salah, he returned, removed the thawb (garment) from me and said, “Stand, O ‘Ali, now that you have been cured.” I stood as if I wasn’t suffering (any pain) before that. He said, “I never asked my Lord for something in my salah except that He granted it to me. And I never asked for something (Him) for something for myself except that I (also) asked for you.”

 

This hadith is narrated by ‘Ali with a few (different) chains of transmission, including:

  1. Imam al Nasa’i and others narrate from Yazid ibn Abi Ziyad — from Sulaiman ibn ‘Abdullah ibn al Harith — from his grandfather — from ‘Ali.[1]

Yazid ibn Abi Ziyad is da’if (weak). He is a mukhtalit (commits serious errors) and a mudallis (obfuscates when he transmits).

Sulaiman ibn ‘Abdullah ibn al Harith and his grandfather are both majhul (unknown). Ibn Hibban, as is his habit, regarded the son (Sulaiman) as reliable.

Imam al Nasa’i says, “Jafar al Ahmar contradicts him and says, ‘…from Yazid ibn Abi Ziyad — from ‘Abdullah ibn al Harith, from ‘Ali.’”[2]

This idtirab (inconsistency) is from Yazid; he has a weak memory.

 
  1. Ibn ‘Asakir narrates[3] with a chain of transmission that contains the narrator al Hassan ibn al Hussain al ‘Urni. He is suspected of lying.

Yahya ibn Ya’la al Aslami is da’if (weak). Additionally, the hadith is mursal.

 
  1. Al Shajari narrates with a chain of transmission that contains two narrators named al Makhzumi and al Faylami.[4] Both of them could not be traced.

Regarding ‘Abbad ibn Ya’qub, as mentioned previously, the more preferred opinion regarding him is that he is a saduq (sincere); unless he narrates manakir (contradictory narrations), in which case they are not acceptable from him. Ibn Hibban states, “He narrates manakir from several famous people and therefore deserves to be abandoned.”[5]

 
  1. Al Mahamili narrates[6] with a chain of transmission that contains the narrator ‘Abdullah ibn Shabib Abu Sa’id al Rib’i. He is matruk (suspected of forgery) and weak. In fact, Fadlak al Razi says it is permissible to chop his head off!

In short, all the (different) chains of transmission are very weak, except for one narrated by al Nasa’i which is (only) da’if (weak). In any case, the hadith is still da’if (weak).

 

NEXT⇒ Hadith 17


[1] Imam al Nasa’i: al Sunan al Kubra, hadith no. 8479 and Khasa’is ‘Ali, hadith no. 147.

[2] Imam al Nasa’i: al Sunan al Kubra, hadith no. 8479 and Khasa’is ‘Ali, hadith no. 148.

[3] Ibn ‘Asakir: Tarikh Dimashq, 42/311.

[4] Al Shajari: Kitab al Amali, 1/697.

[5] Ibn Hibban: Kitab al Majruhin, 2/172.

[6] Al Mahamili: Amali al Mahamili